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Posts tagged ‘pop culture’

Old(er) Pop-Culture is Still Relevant — The Gilmore Girls

In my slightly less-than-enviable DVD collection I have a nice variety of shows (and some movies) that aired or were released in the ballpark of a decade ago. Seeing how I have limited access to current U.S. pop-culture in real-time (I am doing my catch-up, so watch for some last-season musings), I do oft enjoy doing frequent re-watches of these much-loved media gone past.

Sometimes I forget how it is still relevant, especially if you are willing to watch and mull it over through various points of view.

The Gilmore Girls, created and written by Daniel Palladino and Amy Sherman-Palladino was well known for its witty and quick-paced dialogue. It was well praised for its portrayal of single mom Lorelei Gilmore and her teenage daughter, Lorelei “Rory” Gilmore. It was mostly a clever depiction of their lives, centered mostly in the fictional town of Stars Hollow, Connecticut, just outside of Hartford.

More than that, though, the show was an incredibly astute look into the dynamics between three generations of mothers and daughters. Not just of Lorelei and Rory, of which I was able to incredibly relate. Naturally, as a single mother I reached out and embraced Lorelei as someone I could relate to and who I wanted to like, flaws and all. I wanted to raise a kid as wonderful as Rory, someone even as occasionally broken as Rory, but who was able to work through it, and who was able to come to a mother as someone she trusted for help.

The Gilmore Girls also portrayed a relationship between Lorelei and her own mother, Emily. A relationship of brokenness and loss. Emily and Lorelei, both hurting from the years of the cavity that was not having each other, mostly out of necessity — that point can’t be argued — but both not yet willing to admit it at the series’ inception.

The brilliance of the Gilmore Girls was that it was able to tell stories of women and show the way that they lived lives that yes, involved men, but didn’t center on them. It focused on the ways that women in familial settings interacted with and learned to grown up around and together. It demonstrated that there are different kinds of family, and that wounds can be healed, ripped open, licked clean, and healed again.

Was it a perfect representation? No. I think that as the show went on the fan insistence that Lorelei find her One True Love 4-Evah influenced the way the series took its turns. I think that fans wanted Rory to do the same. I think that when Sherman-Palladino left the show in the seventh and final season that there was a rush to wrap things up, and that the primary characters (some of the most intensely independent women) were treated poorly and the men in the principal roles were portrayed unfairly in order to tie up those ends. There are also some incredible issues of race and class to be examined that exist in the primary framework of the show’s concept that just can not be ignored, including the idea of the famous Interchangeable Asian Person.

But the Gilmore Girls gave me a bit of relevant pop culture that I was able to cling to during some important moments in my life. The flaws and cracks in mirror were some of my own as well as that of the writers’. It was refreshing to realize that I was not the only person in the world going through what I was, even if it was only to know that it was in the sense that it was a vague pop-culture connection.

Old(er) Pop-Culture is Still Relevant — The Gilmore Girls

In my slightly less-than-enviable DVD collection I have a nice variety of shows (and some movies) that aired or were released in the ballpark of a decade ago. Seeing how I have limited access to current U.S. pop-culture in real-time (I am doing my catch-up, so watch for some last-season musings), I do oft enjoy doing frequent re-watches of these much-loved media gone past.

Sometimes I forget how it is still relevant, especially if you are willing to watch and mull it over through various points of view.

The Gilmore Girls, created and written by Daniel Palladino and Amy Sherman-Palladino was well known for its witty and quick-paced dialogue. It was well praised for its portrayal of single mom Lorelei Gilmore and her teenage daughter, Lorelei “Rory” Gilmore. It was mostly a clever depiction of their lives, centered mostly in the fictional town of Stars Hollow, Connecticut, just outside of Hartford.

More than that, though, the show was an incredibly astute look into the dynamics between three generations of mothers and daughters. Not just of Lorelei and Rory, of which I was able to incredibly relate. Naturally, as a single mother I reached out and embraced Lorelei as someone I could relate to and who I wanted to like, flaws and all. I wanted to raise a kid as wonderful as Rory, someone even as occasionally broken as Rory, but who was able to work through it, and who was able to come to a mother as someone she trusted for help.

The Gilmore Girls also portrayed a relationship between Lorelei and her own mother, Emily. A relationship of brokenness and loss. Emily and Lorelei, both hurting from the years of the cavity that was not having each other, mostly out of necessity — that point can’t be argued — but both not yet willing to admit it at the series’ inception.

The brilliance of the Gilmore Girls was that it was able to tell stories of women and show the way that they lived lives that yes, involved men, but didn’t center on them. It focused on the ways that women in familial settings interacted with and learned to grown up around and together. It demonstrated that there are different kinds of family, and that wounds can be healed, ripped open, licked clean, and healed again.

Was it a perfect representation? No. I think that as the show went on the fan insistence that Lorelei find her One True Love 4-Evah influenced the way the series took its turns. I think that fans wanted Rory to do the same. I think that when Sherman-Palladino left the show in the seventh and final season that there was a rush to wrap things up, and that the primary characters (some of the most intensely independent women) were treated poorly and the men in the principal roles were portrayed unfairly in order to tie up those ends. There are also some incredible issues of race and class to be examined that exist in the primary framework of the show’s concept that just can not be ignored, including the idea of the famous Interchangeable Asian Person.

But the Gilmore Girls gave me a bit of relevant pop culture that I was able to cling to during some important moments in my life. The flaws and cracks in mirror were some of my own as well as that of the writers’. It was refreshing to realize that I was not the only person in the world going through what I was, even if it was only to know that it was in the sense that it was a vague pop-culture connection.

Monday Random Ten

Severus Snape as portrayed by Alan Rickman. Text reads: No,  Mr.  Diggory [next line] Vampires do not sparkles [next line] ten points from Hufflepuff.
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Seoul is still on the map, and the G20 came and went.

It is beautiful out there! The world is drenched in a quilt of well-worn pink, orange, gold, ruby-red, burgundy, and faded browns. We took a slow (very very slow) walk up to Nam San the other day to take pictures and play in the leaves and let the bite in the air push our lungs open. In was well worth the wearing out of my legs, and the pictures were amazing.

Anyone else going to see Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallow Part I this week? *is jealous* We’ve been seeing only free movies on base to save up for the IPark IMAX viewing when it hits Seoul. NO ONE TALK TO ME ABOUT THE MOVIE UNTIL I SEE IT I MEAN IT I WILL DISOWN YOU!!!!11!!ELEVEN!!

*ahem*

Now it is crunch time, and I have a stack of back-logged writing to finish. So, here you go, your weekly pick-me-up. Please to be playing along!

  • Turn on your iPod or music device of choice (our XBox 360 plays ours from the teevee!)
  • Blog the first 10 songs that come up (no cheating! yeah! no cheating! *wink wink*)
  • Have fun. If you post a video, I strongly encourage lyrics and video descriptions.

Now with little more ado, since I am not a concise person, I bring you this week’s MRT:

  1. Anything But You — The Moldy Peaches
  2. Crazy Little Thing Called Love — Queen
  3. Face to Face (demon remix) — Daft Punk
  4. Rotten Apples — Smashing Pumpkins
  5. The Poet and the Pendulum — Nightwish
  6. Assdrop — Sevendust (how did that get in there? *looks suspiciously at partner*)
  7. Poker Face — Lady Gaga
  8. A Place Called Home — Kim Richey
  9. I Believe In a Thing Called Love — The Darkness
  10. Don’t Stop — Fleetwood Mac

All right, kids! Whatcha got?

Monday Random Ten

A four-paneled macro-comic made of screen caps from <em>Star Wars: A New Hope</em>. Darth Vadar says to Obi Wan Kenobi: I made you some toast. Obi Wan says "It's a bit on the dark side, isn't it?". Third panel, Vadar says "lol". Fourth panel, Obi Won says "lol".
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I think, more than any Monday I have seen in a while, we are going to need an MRT today.

We have a little conference coming to Seoul this week…you may have heard of it. A few important people are gonna show up and chat about some stuff. I have some thoughts. I may discuss them (ad nauseam) in the future.

Anyhow…on w/ the show.

If you haven’t played before:

  • Turn on your iPod or other music playing device.
  • Turn it to “shuffle.
  • Blog (or drop into comments if you don’t have a blog or Facebook/LiveJournal/Dreamwidth/any medium for such things) the first ten songs that come up!
  • Share!
  • Enjoy!

I am not playing by the rules, and you don’t have to either. I first heard this done at Feministe by Jill, who did it on Fridays, and I adopted Natalia’s idea of doing it on Mondays, because my Mondays needed a lift more than Fridays.

  1. To Binge (featuring Little Dragon) — Gorillaz
  2. Viva La Vida (Coldplay Cover) — Lady Gaga
  3. Eternal Flame — The Bangles
  4. Follow Me — 2NE1
  5. Technologic — Daft Punk
  6. Money, Money, Money — Mamma Mia! Company (Korean Cast)
  7. Redemption — Switchfoot
  8. Love the Way You Lie Featuring Rhianna — Eminiem
  9. Say Hey (I Love You) [featuring Cherine Anderson] — Michael Franti & Spearhead
  10. Holding My Own — The Darkness

Michael Franti & Spearhead — Say Hey (I Love You)

Video Description: Filmed at Vig├írio Geral favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the video features Michael singin’ his tune while people are dancing, singing, drumming (on a variety of really cool drums), running, jumping, and children are playing in the streets, in the buildings, and on the beach.

No Good Deed (Part II)…

Cordelia Chase, as portrayed by Charisma Carpenter, a pale woman with dark brown hair, standing on stairs holding a long, slightly curved sword.Angel seems to be a neverending arch of consequences and well-intended deeds that just can’t go unpunished. Angel is constantly making decisions that seem like the right thing to do at the time but always seems to turn up with another twist later. It’s probably a nice effect of that curse.

In “I Will Remember You” he fights a demon and becomes mortal. Everything seems to be hunky-dory and sex and ice cream until it turns out that he has been taken out of the fight for Good, and that Buffy will spend the rest of her (now shortened) life trying to protect him. He makes a choice (without consulting Buffy) to take the day back and trade in his mortality. The consequence is that Buffy loses that memory while he carries it. In “Hero” Doyle sacrifices himself to save a group of half demons, like himself, and with a final kiss, passes his only valuable possession on to Cordelia — his visions from The Powers That Be. Something he was never supposed to do, or so we are lead to believe. That point is still up for debate.

But have them Cordy does. And destroy her they almost do, but not quite. Doyle’s sneaky little transfer (because it was, in all regards, a violation of Cordelia’s autonomy to have them shoved on her) builds in Cordelia like a ticking time bomb, slowly killing her over time. Yet she holds on, and no one notices. Cordelia, prior to becoming a demon or a higher being, is strong without being supernatural. Eventually she is given a choice, and though we later discover that this choice is really a setup for the mass catastrophe that is going to be Season 4, Cordelia chooses Angel and his mission after seeing how it would destroy anyone else to have them. She chooses the visions that have been killing her, and asks to be made part demon so that she can keep them without them killing her. While this undermines the idea that a woman can be strong without being supernaturally imbued, we get to see Cordy being strong for Angel because she has grown as a person, emotionally, and physically.

The results of that choice, are something that can be discussed ad nauseam, and have been before. Cordy being hijacked is a point of contention with me, and I watch S4 just to get from S3 to S5. See s.e. smith’s posts about Cordelia for further explanation. My favorite character deserved to a better ending than that. And even though I have written about her before, I need to revisit this. I don’t want to go into this at length now.

Angel is forced to free a man, by Wolfram & Hart, in order to save Cordelia, and it turns out that he is pretty much misogyny personified.

Wesley’s choice to betray Angel and steal Connor opened the path for Connor to grow up on Qor’toth, and made him the angry and hurting person that he was. His entire life was a result of manipulation, first by ancient powers to create him, then by Holtz, then by Jasmine. Connor’s anger was the weight on one side of the fulcrum that convinced Angel to take the deal with Wolfram & Hart, eventually resulting in the alteration of everyone’s memories, and prolonging Cordelia’s life, allowing her time to come back to him in the 100th episode, “You’re Welcome”.

Faith, whose choices and consequences deserves a whole post of her own, makes some important choices on Angel that viewers of Buffy alone never really see, and that Buffy really neglects to give her credit for. Faith, with Angel’s help learns to take responsibility for her poorer choices in Sunnydale and is a model prisoner until she is attacked by someone paid to off her by those killing Potentials. When Wesley comes to her because Angelus is loose and the Beast is trying to provoke him into helping he and Cordelia-Goddess-Vessel, she makes the choice to bust out of the Pen and help. She uses a vampire drug to bait Angelus into drinking from her, knowing it could very well kill her, but hoping it will do what must be done. For the first time Faith goes all the way as a Slayer, and winds up as the Guide in Angelus’ dream sequence (or whatever). In the end, she stops Connor from dusting Angel after his soul has been put away, and she is able to return to Sunnydale with Willow for the Big Finish, a redeemable player.

When Fred first touched Jasmine’s blood she saw the Goddess who forced her way into the world for what she really was. Fred couldn’t stop until someone else saw what she saw. She needed Angel to see that their free will was being taken away. In the end, she enabled Team Angel to stop Jasmine from taking over the world by peaceful force. It wasn’t until Lilah showed up to reward them with the LA branch of Wolfram & Hart that she realized that what they had actually done was, indeed, as Lilah had said, traded World Peace for Free Will. That moment revealed in Fred’s character just how much she believed that what they were doing was right, and how much she believed that she was on the good side until she saw the consequence. It was the first time she doubted their mission.

The amulet given to Angel by Wolfram & Hart by Lilah, I believe, was indeed intended for Angel to wear in Sunnydale in the case that he didn’t choose to take their deal. The way that it captured Spike and tethered him to the firm demonstrated that they intended to have Angel one way or another. Angel gave the amulet to Buffy to use as she wished, to allow it to be worn by a champion. Buffy insisted that Angel leave, to be the second defense, just in case. She gave it Spike, who wore it proudly, but who, in doing so, was wrenched into a hell devised by W&H to hold onto the wearer. Instead of redemption it brought more work at the hands of the Senior Partners in their production.

Gunn’s brain modifications give him confidence that he really, IMO, didn’t need. Gunn was more than a hired brute, but the modifications made him feel like he was more than he had ever lived up to being, that he was giving more to the team than in the past. When they went away, he panicked, and allowed himself to be manipulated by the doctor into signing papers to help import his illegal artifacts. One of those was an ancient sarcophagus requisitioned by Knox, unbeknownst to Fred. When it ended up in her department, her innate curiosity got the best of her and Illyria was set loose upon her. Gunn set off a chain of events that allowed Knox to fulfill his plan to bring Illyria back in Fred’s body so he could worship them both together. I honestly believe that he death is what ultimately causes both Wesley and Gunn to be so saddened and able to allow themselves to die, Wesley in “Shall Not Fade Away”, and Gunn later in S8 in the comic, when he is changed to a vampire.

Perhaps another re-watch would reveal more overlapping themes. I actually enjoy catching the moments where the two shows arc into each other. The thought that there is often not a clear-cut Good or Bad choice, that many times what seems like the true path to doing the right thing could result in harm somewhere along the way, even if you never see the end result yourself.

No Good Deed (Part I)…

 

No Good Deed (Part I)…

 

Sarah Michelle Gellar as Buffy Summers, a pale woman with blonde hair. She looks on with the beginning of a smile, as if a great weight has been lifted. A pale brunette woman (Eliza Dushku as Faith) is blurred in the background.

Final image from "Chosen", Season 7 and Series Finale

It happens to be that one of the thing that I adore about the shows Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel is that they have a knack for spinning out the long-lasting effects of the consequences of the actions of their characters. While Buffy certainly gets much credit for, if perhaps at some points too much, and Angel is not exactly drowning in, feminist messages, I think that the theme of visiting upon the importance of understanding that all actions, even actions taken under with the best of intentions, have long abiding consequences is an important one for anyone interested in social justice to understand. These consequences might not always be what we imagined or envisioned when we set out upon our mission, and they may not always be shiny, happy, results.

 

The concept that “No good deed goes unpunished” is certainly not lost on Whedon, or, it seems, any of the many writers who helped to bring these stories into fruition. We start as early as “Prophecy Girl” in S1 of Buffy, where Buffy herself, knowing full well that her prophesied fate was to meet the Master and die, embraced that destiny full on to avoid allowing anyone she had come to care about to have to go in for her. As noble as that was, the end result was an upset in the lineage of Slayers, awakening Kendra, a second Slayer, and changing the flow of the distribution of power. As Faith says at the end of S7, they were never meant to exist together in time, and perhaps that is why the dynamics between Faith and Buffy were always in a constant state of upheaval, even though in the end they were able to pull together and discover that they were able to work as a team after all.

In a similar vein, and following with the theme of “Buffy dies a lot”, bringing Buffy back from the dead in the beginning of S6 certainly had the best of intentions. After knowing one person who went to a hell dimension in a sacrifice to save the world (albeit, unwillingly), it wasn’t a far stretch for Willow to imagine that Buffy was in a similar predicament after her own sacrifice in “The Gift” at the end of S5. In an intended noble gesture, Buffy’s friends fiddle with dark powers they didn’t fully understand, wrenching Buffy back from what we later learn is Paradise where she was at peace. What they accomplish is the creation of a malevolent spirit who must destroy her to remain in the world, and, as we find out, awakening Buffy right where they left her — in her coffin under ground. Buffy as to dig herself out to a loud and harsh world where she thinks she is indeed in a hell dimension. Finally, in S7 we find out that this one act, intended to rescue a warrior from an untimely and unnatural death weakened the Slayer line enough to allow The First to act out and attempt to wipe it from time.

When Buffy and Willow, along with Faith and all the other Potentials decide to awaken all Slayer Potentials in order to give enough power to the Potentials in order to fight The First, they succeed in stopping it from succeeding. The idea is that the power of The Slayer should be shared, not doled out to one girl in each generation simply because a group of men generations ago were too weak to fight and resorted to horribly violating a girl. For a moment I am reminded that the violation of young women by men is about power, and in my mind, the power of a Slayer, in this series is intended, however well it is delivered, is about taking that power back. The speech Buffy gives in “Chosen” still makes me cry each time I watch it, because it has a lot of not-just-television relevance to it. But that act of incredible power, while allowing them to Save The World (again) had the consequence of giving Slayer powers to people who, due to circumstances beyond their control, were not capable of handling them, such as Dana.

Dana, we meet mid-season in S5 of Angel in “Damaged”, a very disturbing episode that I have written about before and should re-visit. She has been heavily abused by a serial killer as a child. This, in addition to the dreams and visions that potential Slayer experience throughout their lives, are presumed to have made her “insane”. When her Slayer potential is awakened by Willow’s spell, power that, arguably, she probably would never have received otherwise, she breaks out of the mental hospital where she is, and is unable to control her powers because of the way her mind is coping with that abuse. This episode is one of the most difficult for me to watch. But all the same, Buffy and Willow probably never envisioned a Slayer who was not ready to handle the powers given to her. I am not sure how I feel about the exploitation of an abused women with a disability to make this point. I strongly feel that Steven S. DeKnight and Drew Goddard could have perhaps found a better way to get this message across than continuing on with the Crazy Brunette meme, or perpetuating more harmful stereotypes about mental illness. But here it is, Dana, and this story of a woman who must now be forcibly sedated for her own good because of what Buffy and Willow did.

Tomorrow I hope to continue this discussion by analyzing instances on Angel where the consequences of their well-intentioned decisions went awry, but feel free to have at it in comments. I may be laggy in approving or responding to individual comments.

 

Monday Random Ten

Mark Hammill as Luke Skywalker, Chewbacca, and Harrison Ford as Han Solo. When teenagers try to get liquor in outer space. Text bubbles read: LUKE: We could have the Wookie it up. HAN: Yeah, you look like you're over 21. CHEWY: Ah, I'm not sure about this.

Are the leaves turning where you are? Do you have a yard full of them?

We don’t have either, really, yet. I noticed yesterday that the cherry blossom trees are just beginning to pink up at the top, and the oaks are just as stubborn as ever. I expect they will have their leaves clean through until next May just like this year.

The apples are in abundance, and I have found a few varieties on local stands that I haven’t seen before! Oh the excitement! I am dusting off old favorite Fall recipes and trying out some new ones. The chill in the air is pleasant after a long and wretchedly hot Summer, and it is surely welcomed.

I really miss most of you back home. Some of you that I haven’t talked to in a long time… I really miss you this time of year.

On with the show.

  1. Here it Goes Again — OK Go
  2. Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness — Smashing Pumpkins
  3. Beginnings — Chicago
  4. Loose Lips — Kimya Dawson
  5. Mamma Mia! — Mamma Mia! Company (Korean Cast)
  6. I’ll Turn to You — Christina Aguilera
  7. Get Your Hands Off My Woman — The Darkness
  8. Love Will Never Do (Without You) — Janet Jackson
  9. It’s Alright, It’s OK — Leah Andreone
  10. Carol King — Where You Lead

I sincerely hope you all have a great week, with more downtime than I have staring me in the face. What I was thinking letting us take on all of these activities I am not sure…but I will tell you, the smiles on faces around here are worth it.

Have a great one, all!

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